All posts by Kehaulani Ahu

Francisco

By , November 30, 2016

Solitary confinement does more harm because they don’t see us as human beings. They don’t see young people as lives that matter.

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Juan

By , October 13, 2016

When I was 10-years-old, another student was caught with narcotics and he blamed it on me. At the time I was really trying my best to learn English, and really be a good kid. Students and teachers seeing me get handcuffed brought a bad image of me.

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Dona

By , September 27, 2016

We developed a new model for this facility for the inmates and it’s that Hope Lives Here. I think we need that in a lot of the communities across the country as well.

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Kim

By , September 10, 2016

The If Project started when I asked the question, ‘If there was something somebody could have said or done to change the path that led you here, what would it have been?’ And the number one answer was no positive adult role model.

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Norris

By , September 4, 2016

I did 27 years, 10 months and 18 days in prison for a crime I didn’t commit. It’s been my journey to not allow that to happen to anyone else if I can.

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Kiesha

By , September 2, 2016

When I first got locked up my daughter was in high school. I missed her prom, her graduation, her first day of college. It hurts to know she has to put money on the phone for me to call her, and I’m the mother.

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Tyrone

By , September 2, 2016

You go into juvenile hall and you learn stuff, stuff that a nine-year-old isn’t supposed to learn. You learn how to manipulate. You really learn how to lie. You really learn all these bad things that later come in handy when you hit the joint and you’re exposed to older inmates.

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Tauheedah

By , August 31, 2016

I’m not excusing my father’s actions, but we as people have to work together to make a better system; people that did nothing are still being penalized for their loved ones’ mistakes.

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Andrea

By , August 31, 2016

It’s incredibly difficult to parent from a prison payphone. Most of the women who are incarcerated are mothers, and most of them did not have the means to afford the phone calls…They had to literally decide between buying feminine hygiene products and making a phone call home to their children. Most of the women who are incarcerated in prisons across this country are mothers, and most of them were the primary caretakers of their children.

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Hector

By , August 31, 2016

Prison is not set up to rehabilitate anybody. It’s just a holding tank of like-minded people. The non-violent become violent. The little drug dealer becomes a bigger drug dealer.There’s no healing involved.

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